Explain the Obvious: The Story of the Sower

The story of the sower is found in the new testament in the book of Matthew. It has severable variations, as most parables do, but this one applies best to real estate. My favorite adaption of this parable comes from Jim Rohn.

Remember, the sower was ambitious and the sower had good seed and he never stopped sowing.

Some Seed:

  • Falls by the wayside
  • Falls on rocky ground
  • Falls on thorny ground
  • Falls on good ground

You may not be able to do all that you find out, but make sure you find out all that you can do. -Jim Rohn

Take Action: Pick/find something you can do over the next 7 days that will help you become a better communicator.

Problem Solving: The 3 Questions to Ask Yourself

As real estate professionals we spend time averting and solving problems. When you realize you have a problem, what are the 3 questions you should ask yourself?

  1. What could I do?
  2. What could I read?
  3. Who could I ask?

What Could I Do?

  • Write it down, identify the problem
  • Identify several solutions
  • Identify the possible outcomes

According to Jim Rohn and Greg Herder, the best place to solve a problem is on paper.

What Could I Read?

  • Read the instructions/manual/training guide
  • Read the contract
  • Read what you’ve written down…..again

Who Could I Ask?

Whoever you ask, if they are wise, will want to know your answers to questions 1 & 2. Let’s apply this with a real estate example:

You have a great listing that has been on the market for 5 months. You’ve had only a few showings and zero offers. Your listing agreement expires in 30 days and you don’t believe the sellers will extend the agreement. This is a problem all of us have faced.

Now ask yourself the 3 questions we posted at the beginning of this blog and write down your answers. How will this process benefit you? You will learn to attack the Problem not the Person.

“If someone is going down the wrong road, he doesn’t need motivation to speed him up. What he needs is education to turn him around.” – Jim Rohn.

I believe Neil Armstrong said it best when asked how do you fly to the moon. “You only have to solve two problems when going to the moon: first, how to get there; and second, how to get back. The key is don’t leave until you have solved both problems.”

How Much is Enough? Is The Best You Can Do, All You Can Do?

NO! What if we fell on the floor and did as many sit-ups as we could. Maybe all you can do is 5 before you say, “That’s the best I can do.” You facial expression will probably tell us that you are tired. But if you rest you can do a little more. REST, do a little more, REST, do a little more, REST, do a little more and you will eventually reach 50 sit-ups. 

How Do You Get Started? 

  • Do What You Can
  • Do The Best You Can
  • Rest Very Little

I love asking and getting asked tough questions. One of my favorite Jim Rohn questions is: 

How long do you want it to take to get really good at what you do?

The answer is NOT LONG. We should all be expected to double our value in a reasonable amount of time by making progress. Most people make REST an objective when it should be a necessity. The objective of life is to act. Take action now by doing what you can, the best that you can, and rest very little along the way. 

 

Jim Rohn was a world renowned Business Philosopher and this post is based on his writings. 

 

Managing Your 168 Hours Step #2

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Step #2 @ Work

“If you love what you do, you will have more energy for the rest of your life, too” Laura Vanderkam. Real Estate is challenging and we don’t always love what we have to do, but we should because our lack of passion will eventually show up in the marketplace.

Here are 2 simple steps to help you do what you love and love what you do.

  1. Find work that matches your expertise and your strongest intrinsic motivations
  2. Find a work environment that helps you that will allow you to retain that intrinsic motivational focus, while supporting your exploration of new ideas.

The ultimate goal is to find work that is optimally challenging, where the work calls on your best skills and helps you develop new skills, but is not completely beyond your skill level.

“Happy people are more productive and successful than unhappy people” Laura Vanderkam.

“We can no more afford to spend major time on minor things than we can to spend minor time on major things,” Jim Rohn.