How Much is Enough? Is The Best You Can Do, All You Can Do?

NO! What if we fell on the floor and did as many sit-ups as we could. Maybe all you can do is 5 before you say, “That’s the best I can do.” You facial expression will probably tell us that you are tired. But if you rest you can do a little more. REST, do a little more, REST, do a little more, REST, do a little more and you will eventually reach 50 sit-ups. 

How Do You Get Started? 

  • Do What You Can
  • Do The Best You Can
  • Rest Very Little

I love asking and getting asked tough questions. One of my favorite Jim Rohn questions is: 

How long do you want it to take to get really good at what you do?

The answer is NOT LONG. We should all be expected to double our value in a reasonable amount of time by making progress. Most people make REST an objective when it should be a necessity. The objective of life is to act. Take action now by doing what you can, the best that you can, and rest very little along the way. 

 

Jim Rohn was a world renowned Business Philosopher and this post is based on his writings. 

 

Managing Your 168 Hours Step #2

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Step #2 @ Work

“If you love what you do, you will have more energy for the rest of your life, too” Laura Vanderkam. Real Estate is challenging and we don’t always love what we have to do, but we should because our lack of passion will eventually show up in the marketplace.

Here are 2 simple steps to help you do what you love and love what you do.

  1. Find work that matches your expertise and your strongest intrinsic motivations
  2. Find a work environment that helps you that will allow you to retain that intrinsic motivational focus, while supporting your exploration of new ideas.

The ultimate goal is to find work that is optimally challenging, where the work calls on your best skills and helps you develop new skills, but is not completely beyond your skill level.

“Happy people are more productive and successful than unhappy people” Laura Vanderkam.

“We can no more afford to spend major time on minor things than we can to spend minor time on major things,” Jim Rohn.